Math and science graduates can look forward to careers in a wide range of fields, although many end up in research and teaching. Officially, the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) estimates that 1.14 million are employed in life, physical and social sciences (2012 figures). As of 2013, BLS categorizes 635,700 Americans as employed in scientific research and development positions, down slightly from the previous year.

Learn about potential careers in math and science, and the skills, and training that you need to succeed in this area.

How to Become an Ornithologist

Updated on 14 August 2014
Ornithology is a branch of zoology that focuses on the study of birds. Ornithologists are biological scientists that are experts...
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How to Become an Organic Chemist

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Organic chemistry is a chemistry discipline that studies chemical compounds that are the building blocks of a variety of living...
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How to Become an Operations Research Analyst

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Operations research analysis is a discipline that uses advanced logical methods to solve problems and make better decisions. Since large...
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How to Become an Environmental Scientist

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Environmental science is a very important discipline that deals with the Earth and all of its natural and man-made components....
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How to Become an Entomologist

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Entomology is a branch of arthropodology that focuses on the study of insects. An entomologist is a biological scientist that...
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How to Become an Astrophysicist

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Astrophysics is a field of astronomy that focuses on the physics of the universe such as the physical properties and...
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